There are so many different challenges in fertility. And then a whole new set once you get pregnant. And again when you have the baby.

When I went for my first prenatal appointment with my son, tests revealed I was a carrier for sickle cell disease. My husband knew he was a carrier, but I did not. Luckily, my amniocentesis revealed my son did not have it. Going forward, though, this meant that every time we get pregnant there is a 25% chance the baby has the disease. The only way to avoid this is to do IVF and test each embryo.

We wanted to get pregnant again, so we did IVF with genetic testing. Thankfully, the round resulted in 3 healthy embryos, and we had a successful transfer of a single frozen embryo in late March of last year. Amalia Luna came on her due date, in a very fast, easy delivery, sickle cell disease free.
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But that isn’t the whole story! I’m a labor and delivery nurse and an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant. The reason why I became a lactation consultant is because I had many breastfeeding issues with my first son and there was nothing I wanted more than to breastfeed him. I have polycistic ovary syndrom (PCOS) and insufficient glandular tissue or (IGT), both risk factors for low milk supply. After shadowing a lactation consultant, I realized that I could combine my passion for breastfeeding with my nursing career.
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There are so many different challenges in fertility. And then a whole new set once you get pregnant. And again when you have the baby. I love my job and I love being able to relate to patients, talk to people about what they are struggling with, and help them find solutions that work for them.